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Web Resources

General Information

Numerous Web sites provide information on hearing loss and cochlear implants. Please visit these sites for important information and resources.

Cochlear Awareness Network
http://www.c-a-network.com 
The Cochlear Awareness Network is a group of Volunteers each of whom have lived deaf but have had their hearing returned through technology. They have chosen to be members of the Network to tell their stories, raising awareness for these wonderful changes in their lives. All members are available to discuss their experiences.

Cochlear Implant Support Page at the Illinois School for the Deaf
http://www.morgan.k12.il.us/isd/outreach_services_CISupport.html 
The purpose of this page is to act as a one-stop shop across the manufacturers for topics such as troubleshooting help, aural rehabilitation ideas and general information about cochlear implants.
 
The Children's Hearing Institute
http://childrenshearing.org/custom/resource_guide.html
The Institute provides funding for research, educational support, and other programs related to the restoration of hearing for infants and children with hearing loss or profound deafness.

Hands and Voices Web site
http://www.handsandvoices.org/
Hands and Voices is a nationwide non-profit organization dedicated to supporting families and their children who are deaf or hard of hearing, as well as the professionals who serve them.

Illinois Families for Hands and Voices Web site
http://www.ilhandsandvoices.org/
This is a state chapter of the Hands and Voices National.

The Listen-Up Web site
http://www.listen-up.org/ 
The Listen-Up Web is an excellent Web site with extensive links to other sites about cochlear implants.

Sound and Fury Web site
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/soundandfury/index.html 
This is a Web site surrounding a documentary on cochlear implants called Sound and Fury.This film addresses the decision and struggle of two branches of a family as they decide whether or not to implant their children. This site includes discussion of the debate surrounding implantation of young children and the Deaf cultural perspective on cochlear implants. Lesson plans are provided to teach middle and high school students about hearing, cochlear implants, and communication. Links are provided to a variety of resources on cochlear implants, Deaf culture, and sign language.

Navigating a Forest of Information: One Tree At a Time…
http://www.gallaudet.edu/documents/clerc/ci-m.pdf 
This E- document is designed to assist parents and educators in navigating the extensive forest of information available on cochlear implants. The site is divided into modules on specific topics related to cochlear implants. It provides information within each topic and directs the reader to additional resources. This site is easy to navigate and provides information on topics often not covered via other websites (education and communication, role of sign language). The site is also available in Spanish.
Children with Cochlear Implants Who Sign: Guidelines for Transitioning to Oral Education or a Mainstream Setting

A Website For Teenagers
http://www.ci-4teenz.com/
This interactive and fun website is designed for teenagers. It offers teen testimonials as well as useful information on hearing loss and cochlear implants.

Web sites that simulate listening through a cochlear implant: 

http://www.utdallas.edu/~loizou/cimplants/
http://www.healthaffairs.uci.edu/hesp/Simulations/simulationsmain.htm

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Cochlear Implants
http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/cochlear/ 
The FDA regulates manufactures of cochlear implants. The purpose of this website is to describe cochlear implants, link to FDA approved implants, tell the benefits and risks of cochlear implants, and provide news about cochlear implant recalls and safety issues. There is also information on what educators of implant users need to know, what happens before, during, and after surgery, and where to report problems.

ADA and Cochlear Implants
This website provides individuals with a free resource for questions about third party health insurance reimbursement for cochlear implants and related services. It is a privately-owned site and the owners receive no compensations from manufacturers or providers.

Cochlear Implant & Hearing Aid Interface Systems:

Company that manufactures cochlear implant accessories (custom cables, telephone adapters, microphone systems, stethoscopes, and FM interface).

To order contact:
Robert Mendoza
4404 Hollingsworth Ct.
Rohnert, CA 94928
Phone: 707-585-0609
E-mail: robm_94928@yahoo.com 

Help Kids Hear.org
This website was founded by Tony & Alisa Hake, the parents of two hard of hearing children. It is designed to help parents of hard of hearing and deaf children by providing users with the latest news, commentary, and resources. There is also a discussion forum where parents can read and post questions about hearing loss across a wide variety of categories. The section on cochlear implants provides information on how a cochlear implant works, getting a cochlear implants, and links. 

Cochlear Implant Rehabilitation Resources:
Provides resource links to Manufacturers, Organizations, Informational Sites, Email Groups, Assistive Devices, Hearing Dogs, and Accessories/Miscellaneous.

The Children's Hearing Institute (CHI)
http://www.childrenshearing.org/home.html
The Children's Hearing Institute (CHI) is a private, non-profit foundation that was established in 1983 by Simon C. Parisier, MD, a pioneer in hearing loss and cochlear implant research and surgery. The CHI web site is available in English and Spanish. It features information on cochlear implants and hearing loss, an In The News section, and an extensive Patient and Family Resource Guide highlighting organizations, web sites, educational resources, emotional/social development, support groups, insurance information, online articles, advocacy resources, recommended books/videos/CD's, online tools, annotated research articles, and online forums related to cochlear implants and hearing loss. 

Cochlear Implant Awareness Foundation (CIAF)
http://www.ciafonline.org/
The Cochlear Implant Awareness Foundation provides information, resources, support, and financial assistance to individuals who may be eligible for a cochlear implant. The financial assistance program is not intended to cover the medical procedure itself, but rather to assist families with costs that are not traditionally covered by insurance (i.e., hotel or other travel expenses, childcare, etc.) or expenses which exceed the limits of health care coverage. For more information visit the CIAF website. 

Hearing Loss Association of America
http://www.hearingloss.org/
The Hearing Loss Association of America is the nation’s largest organization for people with hearing loss. HLAA exists to open the world of communication for people with hearing loss through information, education, advocacy and support. 

League for the Hard of Hearing
http://www.lhh.org/
The League for the Hard of Hearing was founded in New York in 1910 and is the oldest and foremost hearing rehabilitation and human services agency in the world for infants, children, adults and seniors who are hard of hearing, deaf and deaf-blind, and their families. Over the years we have seen to the needs of over 1,250,000 people with hearing loss.

Suggested Scales of Development and Assessment Tools:

The following scales of development and assessment tools are provided as a reference. They have been categorized by Auditory Perception/Listening Skills, Speech/Intelligibility, Speechreading, Language, Basic Concepts, and Sign Language. A brief description of each scale/tool and information on availability is provided. 

Auditory Perception/Listening Skills
Auditory-Verbal Ages and Stages of Development (Levels I-VIII) in Cochlear Implants for Kids
Available through: Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 202-337-5220 (V/TTY) Web: http://www.agbell.org/

This checklist outlines the development of listening from sound awareness to auditory comprehension including; discrimination, identification, localization, auditory memory and sequencing, listening from a distance, and listening in noise. 

St. Gabriel’s Curriculum for the Development of Audition, Language, Speech and Cognition
Available through :Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 202-337-5220 (V/TTY) Web: http://www.agbell.org/

This program contains a hierarchical order for the development of auditory awareness and auditory memory progressing from closed set to open set. 

Cottage Acquisition Scales For Listening, Language, and Speech
Available through :Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 202-337-5220 (V/TTY) Web: http://www.agbell.org/

This developmental checklist is for assessment and planning for diagnostic therapy. The listening section progresses from sound awareness to comprehension of paragraphs including phonetic listening skills.

Early Speech Perception Test (ESP) for Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Children
Available through Central Institute for Deaf (CID). Contact Dianne Gushleff at dgushleff@cid.edu or 314-977-0133 or 314-977-0016 (fax)

The ESP test battery is a test of speech perception for profoundly deaf children as young as 3 years of age. The ESP may be used to establish objectives and to measure the effects of a hearing aid or cochlear implant in terms of their impact on the child’s speech perception ability. The kit includes a manual, response forms, box of toys, full-color picture cards and audiocassette. 

Functional Auditory Performance Indicators (FAPI): An Integrated Approach to Auditory Development
Available on line at: http://www.csdb.org/

The FAPI assesses the functional auditory skills of children with hearing loss. It examines seven categories of auditory development: sound awareness, sound is meaningful, auditory feedback, localizing sound source, auditory discrimination, short-term memory, and linguistic auditory processing. A profile of a child’s functional auditory skills is generated after administering all items on the profile. The categories are hierarchical; however, it is appropriate for a child to be working on many skills at the same time. By working on multiple skills from different categories, the child will be learning an integrated approach to auditory skill development.

Test of Auditory Comprehension (TAC)
Available through: Foreworks Publications, Box 82289 Portland, OR 97282, 503-653-2614
The TAC is designed to test the speech reception skills of young children on a linguistic rather than phonetic level. It provides information about the following hierarchical auditory skills: ability to discriminate between linguistic and non-linguistic sounds, word identification, comprehension of speech phrases varying in complexity, comprehension of stories in quiet, and comprehension of stories against competition. Test stimuli are on an audiocassette. The child must fail two consecutive subtests to stop testing. 

Test of Auditory Comprehension of Language-Third Edition (TACL-3)
Available through: AGS Publishing, 4201 Woodland Road, Circle Pines, MN 55014-1796 phone 800-328-2560
Order and inquiries: customerservice@agsnet.com

The TACL-3 measures a child’s auditory comprehension skills including word classes and relations, grammatical morphemes, and elaborated sentences. The child is presented with a picture and points to the phrase or sentence that matches what he/she hears. 

The Screening Instrument for Targeting Educational Risk (S.I.F.T.E.R.) /The Preschool S.I.F.T.E.R.
Available through: The Educational Audiology Association, 13153 N. Dale Mabry, #105, Tampa, Fla. 33624/ 800-460-7322 Web: http://www.edaud.org/

The S.I.F.T.E.R. is used by the teacher to rate the child in comparison to other children in the classroom on 15 items. The responses are plotted on a chart which indicates pass, marginal or fail for each of the five areas of academics, attention, communication, classroom participation, and school behavior. If a child fails in a specific area, they should be referred for further evaluation. The Preschool S.I.F.T.E.R. was developed to be used with preschool children and is similar to the S.I.F.T.E.R.

The Lexical Neighborhood Test (LNT) and the Multi-syllabic Lexical Neighborhood Test (MLNT)
Available through: AUDIOTEC of St. Louis, 2515 South Big Bend Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63143/ 800-669-9065 or 314-781-8890/ 314-781-4946 (fax) Web: http://www.auditec.com

The Lexical Neighborhood Test (LNT) and the Multi-syllabic Lexical Neighborhood Test (MLNT) were developed by Indiana University in 1995. The LNT and MLNT are two new open-set tests of word recognition. These tests include words that the child repeats, and have been used to assess recognition of individual words and phonemes in children who are cochlear implant candidates. The LNT and MLNT are based on the lexical characteristics of word frequency and neighborhood density, and include words found in the vocabularies of children age three to five. Results from these tests with pediatric cochlear implant users have shown that their lexicons appear to be organized into similarity neighborhoods, and these neighborhoods are accessed in open-set word recognition tests. Studies have shown that normal hearing three- and four-year old children are able to recognize all the words from these two open-set speech perception tests at very high levels of performance. Therefore, these results have been used as a benchmark for children with hearing impairments.

The Listening Inventory for Education: an Efficacy Tool (L.I.F.E.)
Available through: The Educational Audiology Association, 13153 N. Dale Mabry, #105, Tampa, Fla. 33624/ 800-460-7322 Web: http://www.edaud.org/

The L.I.F.E. is designed to determine amplification benefit and considers input from both the student and the teacher. The protocol also provides suggestions for intervention accommodations designed for the specific situations that are identified as problems. 

Speech/Intelligibility:

The Arizona Articulation Proficiency Scale-Third Edition
Available through: Pro Ed, Inc. 8700 Shoal Creek Boulevard, Austin, Texas 78757-6897, 800-897-3202 or 800-37-7633 (fax) Web: http://www.proedinc.com

The Arizona-3 is a tool designed to identify misarticulations and total articulatory proficiency. The stimulus pictures show children in more current clothing styles and activities. The test materials also include more ethnic diversity. The instrument has been restandardized on a sample of over 5,500 individuals, representative of the U.S. population according to geographic region, ethnicity, and parents' education level. Gender-specific norms are provided for the early childhood years. The kit includes an examiner’s manual, picture cards, and 25 test booklets.

The Goldman Fristoe: Test of Articulation 2
Available through: AGS Publishing, 4201 Woodland Road, Circle Pines, MN 55014-1796 phone 800-328-2560

Order and inquiries: customerservice@agsnet.com

This test assesses a child’s articulation ability by sampling both spontaneous and imitative speech production. Pictures and verbal cues are used to elicit single word answers that demonstrate common speech sounds. It measures the articulation of speech sounds and identifies and describes the types of articulation errors produced by the child. 

The Phonetic-Phonologic Speech Evaluation Record: A Manual
Available through: Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 202-337-5220 (V/TTY) Web: http://www.agbell.org/

This tool is used to assess the segmental and nonsegmental aspects of speech at both the phonetic and phonologic levels. The phonetic level responses are obtained through imitation. Phonologic level responses are obtained from spontaneous language samples. 

Identifying Early Phonological Needs in Children with Hearing Impairment
Available through: Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 202-337-5220 (V/TTY) Web: http://www.agbell.org/

This is a standardized test used to assess how young children with hearing loss spontaneously use first-level phonological patterns. It numerically rates whether the child’s patterns are missing, emerging, or mastered. 

St. Gabriel’s Curriculum for the development of Audition, Language, Speech and Cognition
Available through : Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 202-337-5220 (V/TTY) Web: http://www.agbell.org/

This curriculum outlines the development of early speech, the development of early auditory feedback skills, and an order for the acquisition of vowels, diphthongs, and consonants. It also provides a developmental checklist of phonological processes. 

Cottage Acquisition Scales For Listening, Language, and Speech
Available through :Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 202-337-5220 (V/TTY) Web: http://www.agbell.org/

This curriculum provides a developmental checklist for assessment and diagnostic planning for therapy. The speech section tracks objectives from Phonetic-Phonologic Speech Evaluation Record and also links these objectives to phonetic listening development. 

Spoken Communication for Students Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: A Multidisciplinary Approach
Available through: Butte Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 1328, Hillsboro, OR 97123-1328, 866-312-8883 (V/TTY), 866-412-8883 (FAX), 503-693-9526 (Direct)

E-mail: service@buttepublications.com
Web: http://www.buttepublications.com

This curriculum includes a Student Speech Record (SSR) which is used to evaluate the following: non-verbal communication (attention, turn taking, eye contact, and breath support) and suprasegmentals, vowels and diphthongs, and consonants at the phonetic, phonologic, and pragmatic levels. The SSR also includes an oral peripheral examination form. 

The Central Institute for the Deaf (CID) Picture Speech Intelligibility Evaluation (SPINE)
Available through: Central Institute for Deaf (CID). Contact Dianne Gushleff at dgushleff@cid.edu or 314-977-0133 or 314-977-0016 (fax)

The SPINE uses colorful pictures to evaluate speech intelligibility in children as young as 6 years of age. The assessment package includes 300 full-color picture cards, a test manual, and 25 response forms. 

Paden-Brown Phonological Kit
Available through Med-El. Contact Linda C. Johnson at ljohnson@medelus.com, 919- 314-1272 or 888-633-3524

This tool is designed to assess spontaneous use of first level phonological patterns in children with hearing loss. It utilizes a list of 25 words that are typically within the speaking vocabulary of young children with hearing loss. The word list provides at least five opportunities for the child to demonstrate how well he/she spontaneously targets each basic consonant feature, such as manner, place, and voicing, as well as each of the primary vowel areas, diphthongs, and basic word patterns. Numerical scoring o f the test reveals whether the child’s patterns are missing, emerging, or mastered. Results can be used for developing auditory and speech goals for the child. The test kit includes an instructional manual, 10 score sheets, and 25 picture cards. 

Speechreading: 

Kendall Demonstration Elementary School (KDES) Preschool Auditory and Speechreading Skills Inventory
Available through: The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, Gallaudet University, Office of Support Services, KDES 800 Florida Avenue, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002-3695

Phone: (202) 651-5045
Web: http://clerccenter.gallaudet.edu

This inventory is used to informally assess a child’s listening (speech & environmental sounds) and speechreading readiness and ability to understand words and phrases (familiar/functional and phrases containing 2 and 3 critical elements). 

Language: 

The Bzoch-League Receptive-Expressive-Language Test (REEL-2), 2nd. Ed.
Available through: Pro Ed, Inc. 8700 Shoal Creek Boulevard, Austin, Texas 78757-6897, 800-897-3202 or 800-37-7633 (fax) Web: http://www.proedinc.com

The REEL-2 is a scale designed for infants and toddlers up to 3 years of age. It measures and analyzes emergent language for intervention planning. Results are obtained from a parent interview and are given in terms of an Expressive Language Age, A Receptive Language Age, and a Combined Language Age. 

The Rynell Development Language Scales III (RDLS III), 3rd Ed.
Available through: Super Duper Publications, P.O. Box 24997 Greenville, SC 29616-2497

Phone: 800-277-8737
Fax" 800-978-7379
Web: http://www.superduperinc.com

The RDLS III assesses receptive and expressive language using real objects rather than pictures for the child to interact with. It is designed for children from 15 months to 7 years of age. The comprehension scale comprises sections such as agents and actions, attributes, locative relations, vocabulary and complex grammar, and inferencing, etc. The expressive scale comprises sections such as verb phrases, auxiliaries, clausal elements, inflections, etc. 

The Preschool Language Scale-4 (PLS-4)
Available through: Harcourt Assessment, Inc. 19500 Bulverde Road, San Antonio, Texas 78259

Phone: 800-211-8378
Web: http://psychcorp.pearsonassessments.com/pai/ca/cahome.htm

The PLS-4 is a standardized test of auditory comprehension and expressive communication for infants and toddlers. The auditory comprehension subscale assesses basic vocabulary, concepts and grammatical markers in preschool and higher-level abilities such as complex sentences, making comparisons and inferences, etc. in older children. The expressive communication subscale asks preschoolers to name objects, use concepts that describe objects, express quantity, use grammatical markers, etc. For older children it includes word segmentation, completing analogies, telling a short story in sequence, etc. This test also includes an articulation screener and a language sample checklist. 

Preschool-Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals (CELF-P)
Available through: Harcourt Assessment, Inc. 19500 Bulverde Road, San Antonio, Texas 78259

Phone: 800-211-8378
Web: http://psychcorp.pearsonassessments.com/pai/ca/cahome.htm

The CELF-P evaluates expressive and receptive language ability. It focuses on word meanings, word and sentence structure, and recall of spoken language. This tool was standardized for children ages 3 years, 0 months to 6 years, 11 months and uses pictures as stimulus for all three areas of language development. The linguistic concepts subtest evaluates the child’s knowledge of modifiers and his/her ability to interpret one-level oral directions. The sentence structure subtest evaluates comprehension of early acquired sentence formation rules and the child’s ability to comprehend and respond to spoken sentences. The recalling sentences in context subtest evaluates recall and repetition of spoken sentences. Formulating labels assesses the child’s ability to name pictures. The word structure subtest assesses the child’s knowledge and use of early acquired morphological rules and forms. 

The MacArthur Communication Development Inventory: Words, Gestures, and Sentences
Available through: Singular/Thompson Learning 401 West “A” Street, Suite 325, San Diego, CA 92101-7904

Phone: 800-730-2214

These questionnaire/checklists ask parents to identify various words that their child either says or signs. It includes vocabulary relating to: things in the home, people, action words, description words, pronouns, prepositions, question words, as well as sentences and grammar. 

The Rossetti Infant-Toddler Language Scale: A Measure of Communication and Interaction
Available through: Linguisystems 3100 4th Avenue, East Moline, IL 61244

Phone: 800-PRO-IDEA
Web: http://www.linguisystems.com

This scale assesses preverbal and verbal areas of communication and interaction including: Interaction-Attachment, Pragmatics, Gesture, Play, Language Comprehension and Language Expression. The examiner can directly observe or elicit a behavior from the child or use the caregiver’s report to equally credit the child’s performance. Results reflect the child’s mastery of skills in each of the areas assessed at 3 month intervals. A parent questionnaire with guidelines for parent interview is also included. 


Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts (SALT)
Available through: Language Analysis Lab, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Waisman Research Center, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison,WI 53705-2280

Phone: 888-440-SALT
Web: http://www.saltsoftware.com/

A 30 minute play session is videotaped and every spoken and signed language utterance is transcribed. This analysis includes information regarding the number and types of spontaneous utterances that the child and caregiver produce. This analysis is intended to provide a portrait of the child’s language, as well as the type of language the caregiver uses while communicating with the child. In order to measure the child’s growth a videotape is made every six months. 

SKI-HI Language Development Scale
Available through: Hope Publishing, Inc 1856 North 1200 East, North Logan, UT 84341

Phone: (435) 245-2888
E-mail: hope@hopepubl.com
Web: http://www.hopepubl.com

This scale is developmentally ordered and contains a list of communication and language skills in varying intervals for different ages. Each age interval is represented by enough observable receptive and expressive language skills to obtain a good profile of a child’s language ability. 

Test Of Semantic Skills-Primary (TOSS-P) (update of former test, Assessing Semantic Skills Through Everyday Themes (ASSET))
Available through: Linguisystems 3100 4th Avenue, East Moline, IL 61244

Phone: (800) PRO-IDEA
Web: http://www.linguisystems.com

The TOSS-P is a receptive and expressive diagnostic test designed to assess a child’s semantic skills. Comprised of twenty realistic line-illustrations depicting natural, real-life scenes, the test is built around six common themes: Learning and Playing, Shopping, Around the House, Working at School, Eating and Health and Fitness. Test items emphasis vocabulary that is meaningful and relevant to the experiences of young children. The TOSS-P surveys ten semantic and vocabulary tasks through five receptive subtests and five expressive subtests. 

St. Gabriel’s Curriculum for the development of Audition, Language, Speech and Cognition
Available through: Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007

V/TTY: 202-337-5220
Web: http://www.agbell.org/
This program contains a hierarchical order for the development of auditory awareness and auditory memory progressing from closed set to open set.

Oral and Written Language Scales (OWLS)
Available through: Super Duper Publications, P.O. Box 24997 Greenville, SC 29616-2497

Phone: 800-277-8737 o
Fax: 800-978-7379
Web: http://www.superduperinc.com

The OWLS assesses higher order thinking, semantics, syntax, vocabulary, and pragmatics. It includes a Listening Comprehension Scale (picture pointing), an Oral Expression Scale (answering questions, and sentence completion) and a Written Expression Scale (use of conventions, syntactical forms, and ability to communicate meaningfully). 

Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)
Available through: American Guidance Service, 4201 Woodland Road, Circle Pines, MN 55014-1796

Phone: 800-328-2560 Ext, 7717
Web: http://www.agsnet.com/

The PPVT measures a child’s understanding of individual words (receptive vocabulary). It is designed for children 2 years 6 months to 18 years of age. Raw test scores are converted into standard cores, percentile ranks and age equivalents. 

Expressive One-Word Picture Vocabulary Test (EOWPVT)
Available through: Super Duper Publications, P.O. Box 24997 Greenville, SC 29616-2497

Phone: 800-277-8737
Fax: 800-978-7379
Web: http://www.superduperinc.com

The EOWPVT assesses a child’s English speaking vocabulary by asking the child to name objects, actions and concepts pictured in illustrations. The test ends on 6 consecutive incorrect responses. 

Receptive One-Word Picture Vocabulary Test (ROWPVT)
Available through: Super Duper Publications, P.O. Box 24997 Greenville, SC 29616-2497

Phone: 800-277-8737
Fax: 800-978-7379
Web: http://www.superduperinc.com

The ROWPVT assesses a student’s knowledge of vocabulary by asking the child to point to the object being named. The test ends when the child cannot correctly identify the pictured meaning of the word in 6 out of 8 consecutive items. 

Grammatical Analysis of Elicited Language, Pre-Sentence Level (GAEL-P)
Available through: Central Institute for Deaf (CID).

Contact Dianne Gushleff at dgushleff@cid.edu or 314-977-0133 or 314-977-0016 (fax)

This test contains three sections: readiness skills, single words, and word combinations. The examiner uses structured play and pictures to elicit language specific to these three areas. The test was developed for children with hearing loss and can be administered in spoken or signed English. 

Teacher Assessment of Grammatical Structures (TAGS)
Available through: Central Institute for Deaf (CID).

Contact Dianne Gushleff at dgushleff@cid.edu or 314-977-0133 or 314-977-0016 (fax)

The TAGS consists of rating forms to be completed by the therapist regarding the child’s understanding of grammatical structures in sentences of at least four words that contain a subject and a verb. The grammatical categories are noun modifiers, pronouns, prepositions, adverbs, verbs, and questions. 

Test of Early Reading Ability-3rd ed (TERA-3)
Available through: Pro Ed, Inc. 8700 Shoal Creek Boulevard, Austin, Texas 78757-6897

Phone: 800-897-3202
Fax: 800-37-7633
Web: http://www.proedinc.com

The TERA-3 measures reading ability of young children ages 3-6 through 8-6. Rather than assessing a child’s reading readiness it assesses their mastery of early developing reading skills. The three subtests include: Alphabet (knowledge of the alphabet and its uses), Conventions (knowledge of the conventions of print), and Meaning (measuring the construction of meaning from print). An overall Quotient is computed using all three subtest scores. 



Sign Language:
 

Checklist of Emerging ASL Skills
Available in: Easterbrooks, S & Baker, S. Language Learning In Children Who Are Deaf And Hard Of Hearing: Multiple Pathways. (2002) Allyn and Bacon, Boston, Mass.

This checklist provides a series of indicators to judge whether a deaf child has components of ASL in his or her communication system. The evaluator should not judge a child’s skills based on English ability. The focus should be on ASL. The checklist should be filled out by at least three different evaluators who are familiar with the child and who are proficient in ASL. 

ASL Development Observation Record
Available through: ASL Resource Teacher, Early Childhood Education Program, California School for the Deaf, Freemont (CSDF), 39350 Gallaudet Drive, Fremont, CA 94538

Phone: (510) 794-2536

This tool was developed by the Early Childhood Education program at the CSDF to document the ASL language development of deaf children from the time they entered the program to Kindergarten. The goal of the observation record is to identify the language strengths and needs of each child and to document the progress made over the time spent in the Early Childhood Education program. This record also serves as a guide for teachers in assessing their role as language models and how they use language with the children. 

The American Sign Language Proficiency Assessment (ASL-PA)
Available by contacting: Dr. Sam Supalla, Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation, and School Psychology, College of Education, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721

TTY: 520-621-9466 
E-mail: ssupalla@u.arizona.edu

The ASL-PA globally assesses the expressive ASL skills of children ages 6-12 years of age. Items/target features are based on ASL acquisition studies. Language samples are elicited from varied discourse contexts. There are no sample norms presently available. 

Test of American Sign Language (TASL)
Available by contacting: Dr. Philip Prinz, Department of Special Education and Communicative Disorders, San Francisco State University

Phone: 415-338-7655
E-mail: pm@sfsu.edu

The TASL consists of two production measures (Classifier Production Test, and Sign Narrative) and four comprehension measures (Story Comprehension, Classifier Comprehension Test, Time Marker Test, and Map Marker Test). It is designed to be used with deaf students ages 8-15 years.  

Computer Software for Developing Spoken Language Skills: 

Earobics (Step 1, Step 2, Adolescent/Adult version)
Available through: Technology for Education, 1870 East 50th Street, Suite 7, Inver Grove Heights, MN 55077, 651-457-1917, http://www.tfeinc.com, or Super Duper Publications, Dept. SD 2002, PO Box 24997, Greenville, SC 29616-2497, http://www.superduperinc.com

Earobics are colorful, interactive games to train listening skills. The games provide immediate feedback and are motivational. Step 1 provides six games focused on a range of fundamental listening and sound awareness skills. The games can be modified to work on beginning, intermediate, or advanced tasks. Step 2 provides more advanced listening activities to address phonics and language skill development. There are clinical and home versions of the software. The clinical versions provide greater flexibility in modifying activities. 

Exploring First Words (I and II)
Available through: Laureate Learning Systems, Special Needs Software, 110 East Spring Street, Winooski, VT 05404-1898

Phone: 800-562-6801
Web: http://www.laureatelearning.com/

Exploring First Words provides activities to promote basic vocabulary development. The program is designed to give the instructor control over the content and presentation of the lesson. Levels I and II are similar in difficulty, varying only in the content of the vocabulary addressed. They each provide opportunities for students to listen for vocabulary associated with ten categories, including animals, body parts, clothing, common objects, food, household items, outside things, toys, utensils, and vehicles. 

The Great Action Adventure
Available through: Super Duper Publications, Dept. SD 2002, PO Box 24997, Greenville, SC 29616-2497

Web: http://www.superduperinc.com

The Great Action Adventure is a software program designed to teach more than 100 verbs through listening and sign language. The program provides the opportunity to listen to a word and then see the associated sign via a brief video clip. Appropriate for ages 2 and up.

IBM SpeechViewer III
Available through: Edmark, PO Box 97021, Redmond, WA 98073-9721

Phone: 800-362-2890
Web: http://www.riverdeep.net/

IBM SpeechViewer III is an interactive computer program that proceeds from simple to advanced exercises providing visual feedback to support development of voice and speech production skills. The system includes the games from Visual Voice Tools as well as more advanced activities that focus on phonological development as well as pitch and loudness patterning. Purchase of the program includes a microphone and a clinical tracking system. It is intended for therapy/school use. 

Intelli-Talk II
Available through: Intellitools, Inc., 1720 Corporate Circle, Petaluma, CA 94954

Web: http://www.intellitools.com
Phone: 800-899-6687

Intelli-Talk II is a word processing program that combines text, speech, and graphics. Students can listen to spoken production of letters, names, words, and sentences as they type. Text voicing is possible for letters, words, sentences, or a whole page at a time. Speech pronunciation can be modified for unusual spelling. The program comes with numerous pictures and pre-designed templates to develop individualized programs for each student. Activities can be modified for pre-readers utilizing an included picture library. 

Listen-Hear
Available through: Avaaz Innovations Inc., PO Box 8040, 1225 Wonderland Road North, London, Ontario N6G 2B0

Phone: 519-472-7944
Web: https://www.spectronicsinoz.com/product/105

This software is divided into three sections: Sound Discrimination, Vocabulary Development, and Language Concepts. Each section can also be purchased individually. The Ling 6-sound test is included via a game that develops awareness and identification of these sounds. The progression through each level includes the option to "familiarize" the child with the specific targeted sounds for each unit prior to initiating the unit. The program also provides options for choosing which sounds/words to include in each activity. After participating in the familiarization portion of the software, the progression through the activity is pre-set and must be completed before moving to another activity. 

Locu-Tour Literacy CD-Rom: Phonemic Awareness (pre-kindergarten to adult)
Available through: Super Duper Publications, Dept. SD 2002, PO Box 24997, Greenville, SC 29616-2497

Web: http://www.superduperinc.com

Technology for Education, 1870 East 50th Street, Suite 7, Inver Grove Heights, MN 55077
Phone: 651-457-1917
Web: http://www.tfeinc.com

Software includes seven activities to develop letter identification, word identification, lipreading, spelling, and memory for sounds. The lipreading component is especially useful for deaf/hard of hearing students. Each activity includes options to modify the difficulty level. The software is easy to use and can be modified for a variety of ages and listening/phonemic levels. (See other LocoTour software including Phonology, Articulation, and Look, Listen, and Learn.) 

Nouns and Sounds
Available through: Laureate Learning Systems, Special Needs Software, 110 East Spring Street, Winooski, VT 05404-1898

Phone: 800-562-6801
Web: http://www.laureatelearning.com

Nouns and Sounds is an easy-to-use program that helps children discriminate and identify 100 environmental sounds. Users can select specific sounds and pictures to modify for individual listening levels. A variety of games is offered within the software. Photographs are used. 

Otto’s World of Sounds
Available through Oticon, Inc.
Phone: 1-800-526-3921
Web: http://www.oticonchildren.com/children/com/home.htm

Games revolving around listening for sounds in ten varied environments (i.e. house, kitchen, farm, beach, etc…) Each environment contains 10 different sounds common to that environment ( i.e. doorbell, telephone, blender, farm animals, waves). A variety of activities are offered for each environment to help students identify and remember these sounds. The activities are easy for students to navigate, and the sound quality for the varied sounds is very good. 

Seeing and Hearing Speech (lessons in lipreading and listening)
Available through Sensimetrics 
Web: http://www.sens.com

Seeing and Hearing Speech: Lessons in Lipreading and Listening is a software program for established language users to train and practice lip-reading at their own pace and at home. This new interactive CD-ROM from Sensimetrics Corporation contains carefully planned lessons that help people combine what they see with what they hear to understand speech better. 

Hear We Go (Individualized rehabilitation workbook for teenagers)
Available through Cochlear Americas
Web: http://www.cochlearamericas.com/index.asp

This CD contains an easy to install program that allows the therapist to access rehabilitation exercises and generate an individualized rehabilitation workbook for the Nucleus recipient. The workbook is built around 24 different topical interests for older children and teenagers and has 3 different auditory skill levels within each topic. It can either be printed or emailed to the recipient it has been designed for. It also contains additional topics like Active Listening, Telephone Training, Communication Strategies, and more. It can either be printed or emailed to the recipient it has been designed for.

Sound and Beyond (interactive listening rehabilitation for adults)
Available through Cochlear Americas 
Web: http://www.cochlearamericas.com/index.asp (retail price is $290.00)

This CD is a self-paced, interactive computer listening tool that offers: Pure Tone Discrimination, Environmental Sounds, Male/Female Identification, Vowel Recognition, Word Discrimination, Everyday Sentences and Music Appreciation. There are five different skill levels within each topic and over 10,000 sounds, words, and sentences. It reports tracking progress to view and share. One lisence can be shared with up to three different users at a time. 

Talk Time with Tucker
Available through: Laureate Learning Systems or Technology for Education, 1870 East 50th Street, Suite 7, Inver Grove Heights, MN 55077

Phone: 651-457-1917,
Web: http://www.tfeinc.com

Talk Time with Tucker is a set of voice-activated programs for young children; a variety of activities are included, all with the goal of facilitating use of voice. 

Visual Voice Tools
Available through: Edmark, PO Box 97021, Redmond, WA 98073-9721
Phone: 800-362-2890
Web: http://www.riverdeep.net/

Technology for Education, Inc. 1870 East 50th Street, Suite 7, Inver Grove Heights, MN 55077
Phone: 651-457-1917
Web: http://www.tfeinc.com/

Visual Voice Tools is a software that includes seven child-centered games from IBM Speechviewer III to help students develop control of voicing and the suprasegmental aspects of speech production. Activities are provided to promote practice with: sound presence, loudness, voice onset, voice timing, pitch range, and pitch control. These games are appropriate for children of all ages. This software can also be used at home. 

Words Around Me
Available through: Laureate Learning Systems, Special Needs Software, 110 East Spring Street, Winooski, VT 05404-1898

Phone: 800-562-6801
Web: http://www.laureatelearning.com 

Technology for Education, Inc., 1870 East 50th Street, Suite 7, Inver Grove Heights, MN 55077
Phone: 651-457-1917
Web: http://www.tfeinc.com

The Words Around Me software program associates common vocabulary words with associated pictures. The students have the opportunity to listen to a word and see a variety of associated pictures. They can work independently and practice their listening for specified words while building a broader vocabulary. 

Hear We Go (individualized rehabilitation workbook for Nucleus recipient)
Available through: Cochlear Americas
Web: http://www.cochlear.com/

This CD contains an easy to install program that allows the therapist to
ccess rehabilitation exercises and generate an individualized rehabilitation workbook for the Nucleus recipient. The workbook is built around 24 different topical interests and 3 different auditory skill levels. It can either be printed or e-mailed to the recipient it has been designed for. 

Sound and Beyond (interactive listening rehabilitation for adults)
Available through Cochlear Americas
Web: http://www.cochlear.com/ (retail price is $290)

This CD is a self-paced, interactive computer listening tool that offers: Pure Tone Discrimination, Environmental Sounds, Male/Female Identification, Vowel Recognition, Word Discrimination, Everyday Sentences, and Music Appreciation. There are five different skill levels within each topic and over 10,000 sounds, words, and sentences. It reports tracking progress to view and share. One license can be shared with up to three different users at a time. 

Curricula/Training Programs: 

Ausplan (Auditory Speech Language): A Manual For Professionals Working With Children Who Have Cochlear Implants Or Amplification (2003)
Manual developed by Adeline McClatchie and Mary Kay Therres, members of the pediatric cochlear implant team at Children’s Hospital and Research Center in Oakland California to guide professionals in developing a communication therapy plan for children with cochlear implants and/or hearing aids. The manual includes a useful framework for rating a child’s potential to use a cochlear implant as well as performance outcomes. The manual is clearly organized and presents many tools to guide planning and training in the separate yet connected areas of auditory, speech, and language development. 

Bringing Sound to Life: Principles and Practices of Cochlear Implant Rehabilitation
This program provides a systematic approach to spoken language habilitation for children of all ages. It includes a video training series, a manual, and a program to develop phoneme perception and a production called Word Associations for Syllable Perception (WASP). The video training series includes four videotapes: 1) Building Blocks of Spoken Language; 2) Understanding Hearing and Hearing Loss; 3) Cochlear Implants and Children: An Opportunity, Not a Cure; and 4) Principles and Practices of Cochlear Implant Rehabilitation. The videos are an excellent resource for family education and/or teacher training. The manual provides insights, strategies, and tools integral to the spoken language habilitation process. The WASP program includes a laminated set of picture cards. This program can be purchased as a package or as individual components. 

CHATS :The Miami Cochlear Implant, Auditory and Tactile Skills Curriculum
Available through :Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 V/TTY: 202-337-5220
Web: http://www.agbell.org/

The guide provides a sequence of goals to facilitate auditory development for students of all ages using a variety of technologies including cochlear implants. There are receptive and expressive goal categories. The focus of the receptive goals is perception while the focus of the expressive goals is production. The objectives within each category follow a developmental sequence. Activities are provided to support the goals in each category. 

Classroom Goals: Guide For Optimizing Auditory Learning Skills
Available through :Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 V/TTY: 202-337-5220
Web: http://www.agbell.org/

This guide was designed to support development of auditory learning regardless of hearing level, type of amplification device used, grade level, or mode of communication. The guide describes practical ways for teachers to create situations to encourage development and use of residual hearing in the classroom. Lessons are suggested to demonstrate how to incorporate auditory experiences into learning. While the activities described are content specific, the strategies incorporated can be applied to any content area or book. 

Contrasts for Auditory and Speech Training (CAST)
Available through: Linguisystems, 3100 4th Avenue, East Moline, IL 61244-9700
Phone: 800-776-4332
Fax: 800-577-4555 
Web: http://www.linguisystems.com/custom.php

CAST is an analytic auditory training program for children with cochlear implants or hearing aids. CAST includes pre-test, step-by-step procedures for analytic auditory training and a progress log. It also provides 600 full-color stimulus pictures for listening practice. 

Cottage Acquisition Scales For Listening, Language, and Speech
Available through :Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 V/TTY: 202-337-5220
Web: http://www.agbell.org/

A product to help assess, select objectives, and plan instruction to document and facilitate language acquisition in children with hearing loss. It is based on many of the language development beliefs of researcher Christie Yoshinaga-Itano (Language assessment of infants and toddlers with significant hearing loss, Seminars in Hearing, 1994) It includes a set of scales (pre-verbal, pre-sentence, simple sentence, complex sentence, sounds and speech) that follow the development of language, listening, cognition, and speech. The assessment component is based on language sampling. It also provides suggestions for using the tool to promote instruction in the addressed areas. 

Learn To Talk Around The Clock
Available through: Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 V/TTY: 202-337-5220
Web: http://www.agbell.org/

This oral early intervention program is designed for professionals who work with families of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. It focuses on language learning in the child’s home environment. It provides a toolbox for professionals to maximize the caregiver’s language development techniques by encouraging interactions during everyday activities. The premise is that providing opportunities for interaction in everyday life provides the groundwork for auditory and language development. The curriculum includes a toolbox and VHS cassette. 

Listen, Learn, and Talk
Available through: Cochlear Corporation, 61 Inveness Drive East, Suite 200, Englewood, CO 80112
V/TTY: 800-523-5798
Fax: 303-792-9025 
E-mail: info@cochlear.com
Web: http://www.cochlear.com/

An auditory habilitation program for young deaf and hard of hearing children who are learning to listen and talk. It consists of a manual and three videotapes (Babies Babble, Toddlers Talk, and Children Chatter). The videos provide practical ways that families can provide spoken language enhancement in their home. The manual provides information on the importance of parent participation in the habilitation process, theory behind auditory development, strategies for facilitating spoken language development, and integrated scales for monitoring/documenting development in listening, language, speech, cognition, and social communication. 

Listen Little Star (A Listening Program)
Available through Auditory Verbal International
Web: http://www.auditory-verbal.org/llstar.asp

Manual and activity guide available through Auditory Verbal International, Inc (AVLI) to facilitate spoken communication with deaf and hard of hearing infants. Developed by Dimitry Dornan a Speech Pathologist and Certified Auditory-Verbal therapist. The techniques described are based on Auditory Verbal techniques. The program includes a manual with handouts about hearing loss and a step by step plan of sequential activities for the child, family and professional. 

My Baby and Me
Developed by: Betsy Moog Brooks. The Moog Center for Deaf Education, 12300 South Forty Drive, St. Louis, MO 63141. 

Web: http://moogcenter.org/Bookstorenbspnbspnbspnbspnbsp/tabid/149/Default.aspx

My Baby and Me is a notebook-style resource for parents (and professionals working with them) that provides strategies and tips for helping a child learn to listen and talk in an easy-to-use "baby book" format that is personalized for each child and family. This resource provides detailed information and resources about language learning and hearing loss and provides space for families to document their child's individual development. While developed for families using an "oral only" approach to communicati

Phono-Graphix
Available through: Read America
Phone: 352-735-9292
Web: http://www.readamerica.net

This program is intended to support phonemic development and reading and includes an instructional manual and materials. The program can be used as part of a reading and/or speech development program. It addresses skills to support children in "breaking the reading code." It teaches children that letters are pictures of sounds, that sound pictures can be one or more letters, that there is variation in the code, and that there is overlap in the code. 

St. Gabriel’s Curriculum for the Development of Audition, Language, Speech and Cognition
Available through: Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 V/TTY: 202-337-5220
Web: http://www.agbell.org/

A guide for professionals working with children with hearing loss from birth to 6 years. The guide provides a developmental sequence for the areas of audition, language, speech and cognition. The audition component describes auditory awareness, the 7-sound test, and auditory memory, The language component describes expressive and receptive developmental sequence for the structures of English. The Speech section follows the developmental stages of early speech, the development of auditory feedback skills, and an order for the acquisition of vowels, diphthongs and consonants. It also provides a developmental checklist of phonological processes. The cognitive section details a hierarchical order for the development of critical thinking skills. While the guide was developed for a center utilizing the Auditory Verbal approach, its sequences can be applied to students using a range of communication methodologies and educational approaches. 

See-the-Sound Visual Phonics
Available through: International Communication Learning Institute, See the Sound Visual Phonics, 10712 308th Avenue, Princeton, MN 55371

Phone: 763-389-4875
E-mail: riggsll@msn.com

This program uses a combination of visual, tactile, kinesthetic, and auditory feedback cues to assist in developing phonemic awareness, speech production, and reading skills. It provides a system to help

SMILE
Available through :Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 V/TTY: 202-337-5220
Web: http://www.agbell.org/

SMILE is a multi-sensory program that teaches speech, reading, and writing to children with severe language and communication delays, including those with hearing loss, dyslexia, or autism. Unique in its engaging yet simple focus, SMILE uses expressive and receptive modalities to improve the reading skills of target and general populations.

Spoken Communication for Students Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: A Multidisciplinary Approach
Available through: Butte Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 1328, Hillsboro, OR 97123-1328

V/TTY: 866-312-8883
Fax: 866-412-8883 
Direct: 503-693-9526
E-mail: service@buttepublications.com
Web: http://www.buttepublications.com

A speech text that supports the instructional best practice of using a multidisciplinary team approach to develop spoken communication skills regardless of the type and degree of hearing loss or the educational philosophy. This habilitative program allows for teachers, speech therapists, parents and school personnel as well as the student to work together within the classroom setting to establish, develop and support spoken communication skills. The test is user-friendly and provides pictures, forms, springboard discussions, experiments, and practical ideas for use in school or at home. 

Top Ten Strategies for Parents (Parent manual, professional manual, videotape)
Available through :Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 V/TTY: 202-337-5220
Web: http://www.agbell.org/

Developed by Jill Bader, Founding Director of the Hear At Home program in Colorado (303-841-7987, jbaderconsultant@aol.com). The manuals (one for families and one for professionals working with families) include clearly written descriptions of ten strategies to facilitate a child’s learning to listen and speak. With catchy names for strategies such as “Three Ring Circus”, “Bore Me To Death” and “Make Your Point”, this resource provides the important premises and foundations for promoting development of spoken language skills in terms that anyone will understand. The described strategies remove the professional jargon and help make sense of the information for families. The accompanying videotape demonstrates each of the 10 strategies. 

Additional Resources:

Animusic
Available at: http://www.animusic.com/
Animusic is a visual display of musical instruments playing a range of music. An engaging video/DVD, it provides an opportunity to visually experience music.

Listening Games for Littles
Available through :Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 202-337-5220 (V/TTY) Web: http://www.agbell.org/
Developed by Dave Sindrey, Certified Auditory Verbal Therapist, the book is designed for parents and professionals working with children age 4 and under. Practical, fun ideas for integrating listening into the learning of a young child are provided. The book is divided into sections on listening, hearing, listening tips, and listening ideas. 

It Takes Two to Talk: A Parent’s Guide To Helping Children Communicate
Available through :Alexander Graham Bell Association, 3417 Volta Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007 202-337-5220 (V/TTY) Web: http://www.agbell.org/
This book provides strategies for families to use in their daily life to facilitate early communication. It provides ideas to help families see their child as communicators and include their child in the communication process. 

Sign with your Baby
Available through http://www.sign2me.com
This video and manual train families on how to teach sign language to hearing babies. Based on research related to early language development, this program provides the materials for families to learn basic signs to use with their baby to facilitate signed language as an avenue to promote communication prior to the emergence of spoken language. 

Summer’s Story—Coming of Age with the Cochlear Implant
(VHS 27 minutes, ASL and voice, open captioned)
Written by Summer Crider; Produced by Michael Munroe
Available through: Monroe Multimedia (m2media@alltel.com)
This is the story of Summer Crider, who is profoundly deaf and uses a cochlear implant, from birth to the time she entered college. The story is primarily Summer’s own, but includes interviews with her family, friends, and teachers. Summer became deaf at the age of three from spinal meningitis. The video describes her educational journey prior to receiving a cochlear implant and after, from a school for the deaf, to a regular mainstream school, and back to a school for the deaf where she finds peer support within the Deaf community. Summer describes her love/hate relationship with her cochlear implant and how she came to accept it as a “tool” instead of a stigma. She states that she hopes to become the bridge between the “Deaf” and the “Hearing” communities, as she grew up in both. 

Sound or Silence: Discovery Health Channel Video
(VHS 52 minutes, open captioned)
Available through: Discovery Health Channel at: http://www.discovery.com/health
This video is a compilation of a Discovery Health Channel series about cochlear implants. It provides information about the history of cochlear implant technology. It describes how the normal ear processes sound and the impact of deafness. Through a series of interviews, the video provides insight into varied perspectives about the implant. It discusses the deaf culture/community’s perspective regarding implanting children as well as interviews with adults (culturally deaf and late deafened) who received implants. Parents (hearing and deaf) discuss their views and decisions to implant or not to implant. Overall, this video provides comprehensive information about cochlear implants, the complexity of the decision making process, and the perspective of the deaf community. 

ASL Songs For Kids
Available through: Institute for Disabilities, Research and Training Inc at: http://www.idrt.com/
A CD that provides six songs typically learned by young children. The songs presented in both spoken language and American Sign Language are: The Wheels on the Bus, Happy Birthday, The Ants Go Marching, The Green Grass Grows All Around, Old MacDonald Had a Farm, and Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star. As the songs are sung, Paws the dog signs, and graphics convey the lyrics, as well as information about the notes and volume.

Many thanks to our friends at Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center for allowing us to utilize this wonderful list resources!
Compiled by: Brenda Seal, JMU; Kelly Clingempeel, JMU; Debra Nussbaum, Clerc Center; Susanne Scott, Clerc Center; Bettie Waddy-Smith, Clerc Center

This is a reference list of articles related to the following topics: Predictors of Success: Child, Family, & Implant Predicotrs; Habilitation & Education: Intervention Strategies & Placement Issues; Age At Implantation: Favors Young Children; and Diverse Outcomes: Users of Spoken Language, Sign Language, & Both.

 

 

 


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